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August 11th, 2012


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03:33 pm
Much of the last couple of weeks' viewing on TV has been devoted to Olympics coverage, though forestcats and I agree that we're less than impressed with NBC's work. However, when we've been burned out by it all, we put in some time to watch 42 Up and 49 Up, continuing that series of documentaries about a group of people who've been followed since the early 60s to watch their growth in society. Apparently, correspondents tell me that 56 Up has been shown in Britain a few months ago, so it's not yet out on video. We've found it all interesting, so we'll keep watching for its release.

Another week, another essay; I posted to LJ my World Music essay on Tuvan throat singing. I should look ahead and see what sort of music next week brings, but I'm still struggling to read Dracula for F&SF, and not enjoying it. Essay for that by Tuesday!!!

We're having Rolemaster today. I'm not sure who all will be playing.

(10 comments | Speak, or forever hold your peace)

Comments:


From:moria923
Date:August 11th, 2012 04:03 pm (UTC)
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I'm enjoying Dracula, but still just a little more than halfway through it. Now I remember why, in college, I often felt like I was always behind!
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From:mycroftca
Date:August 11th, 2012 06:37 pm (UTC)
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I'm close to 3/4; I feel frustration on reading it. The prose doesn't gel for me.
From:mythusmage
Date:August 11th, 2012 11:57 pm (UTC)
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The style is what gets most people today. Remember in Bulwar-Lytton's day the man was considered a leading prose stylist.
From:mythusmage
Date:August 11th, 2012 11:58 pm (UTC)
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Note, in addition, that in Shakespeares time how he wrote was very much how people spoke.
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From:mycroftca
Date:August 12th, 2012 01:40 pm (UTC)
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Indeed!
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From:jamiethered
Date:August 13th, 2012 04:22 pm (UTC)
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According to one of my Professors at UCI, no one ever spoke the way Shakespeare wrote. That's supposedly one of the reasons we can still read it today. He wrote in a very conscious style of how he thought the upper classes spoke. The result was accessible to everyone, but not accurate. Read Ben Johnson's works, they're much harder to understand, because he used current slang and it's made his works nearly incomprehensible today.
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From:mycroftca
Date:August 14th, 2012 01:42 am (UTC)
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Nice. I wonder if any are available via Project Gutenberg?

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From:jamiethered
Date:August 14th, 2012 03:41 pm (UTC)
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Should be, though we were required to buy hard copy back in the day. I wonder if I still have it? I'll have to check.
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From:mycroftca
Date:August 14th, 2012 11:07 pm (UTC)
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Of course you did; probably introduced by the professor's buddy.

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From:mycroftca
Date:August 12th, 2012 01:39 pm (UTC)
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But only on a dark and stormy night.
Much of the last couple of weeks' viewing on TV has been devoted to… - This ain't no party, this ain't no disco... — LiveJournal

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