July 29th, 2012

Dead Dog Cat

(no subject)

Although I've been pressing to finish homework-related readings, I did manage to finish an unrelated book today, this being Osprey Campaign #114: Lepanto 1571: The Greatest Naval Battle of the Renaissance. This was an important battle to deal with Ottoman expansion into Europe, thus a vital campaign in world history. Not a bad read; some good graphics.
Dead Dog Cat

(no subject)

Life has had its ups and downs since I posted yesterday.

To the good: we went to the home of themodeinliz and axelicious where first my wife was involved in a producers meeting for Dungeonmaster's upcoming season starting 9/16, IIRC; then following that we had a meeting involving more of the cast and crew, including me, to plan next season's stories. I'll be reprising my role as continuity/story editor, so I look forward to getting the scripts to review.

During the former meeting, axelicious and I sat while he bounced through the four channels he had devoted to the Olympics. When I got bored with a particular sport, I picked up and read one thing or another. This led to me getting nearly to the end of one book, advancing in a homework book, and finishing a couple weeks worth of comics. First of those was Fairest #5, not bad at all; second was Fables #119, which was sick in a very Grimm's Fairy Tale way, as I suppose it should be. We'll see how it continues. I guess I'm not giving up on the series yet.

Home, we napped. I got over two hours; my wife more. We puttered into the evening, and forestcats then prepared a dish for our Havurah's breakfast for the homeless. However, when it turned out that our cat, Ghost, was in pain, she ran out to the emergency vet clinic, to find out that the poor kitty was stricken with urologic obstruction. He's now in cat heaven. Sadness.

I have no desire to go out today, or do anything outside our property. I have homework, laundry, computer clean-up duties, and maybe even another nap on the agenda, before I start being on call tomorrow...
Dead Dog Cat

first essay for F&SF class

The foundation for fantasy and science fiction literature began in oral tales, many of which were collected in the Nineteenth Century by the Brothers Grimm though such an oral tradition hearkens to the beginning of civilization. These stories are retold even today in such television series as Once Upon a Time, and motion pictures such as Snow White and the Huntsman. These fables are in their original intention a means of teaching in a time when there was no schooling for the average child. They allowed the young to learn creative and critical thinking, even though the stories are full of magical events and strange coincidences. Even though these were unlikely to happen in real life, much was made of how these magic items were used.



My opinion of the tales was that I got bored with the repetition, though the pleasure of recognition leavened that feeling. It seemed like most tales involved multiples of three: three brothers or sisters, three animals, three magic items, three opportunities to succeed. The repetition left me cold, but I can see its importance in the use of the fable as a form of education. Repetition would make the lesson clearer to the audience. In a number of the tales, key phrases were repeated often. I can still remember from my childhood watching the Fractured Fairy Tales portion of the Rocky and Bullwinkle Show the phrase 'Rapunzel, Rapunzel, let down your hair so I can climb the golden stair", which isn't quite what the fable states in this version, but that's how the refrain played out in my mind. In a way, my recognition of these stories, bored or not, connects me to the folks from whom the Grimms garnered them.