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July 26th, 2014


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08:01 am
Earlier this week, I finished reading Osprey Campaign #156: The Doolittle Raid 1942: America's First Strike Back at Japan which gives great detail to the whole event. A strike more psychological than damaging physically, it was still an important action on the part of the United States. I didn't realize that the US fleet was sighted and reported before they reached their launch point; the book speaks to this. All-in-all a good work of this small part of history.

(4 comments | Speak, or forever hold your peace)

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[User Picture]
From:7leaguebootdisk
Date:July 26th, 2014 05:48 pm (UTC)

a detailed review

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As I always understood it, they were sighted, and worried they had been reported before they could sink the ship that saw them, they launched the raid too far out, and thus none of the aircraft made it to their landing fields. The ship that saw them did not get a message off before being sunk.
[User Picture]
From:mycroftca
Date:July 27th, 2014 04:39 am (UTC)

Re: a detailed review

(Link)
According to the book, the trawler DID get off a message, but the Japanese navy expected that the task force would have to get within nearly 200 miles of the coast before launching; they never expected heavy bombers to be launched. The Americans did launch well out from where they'd intended, and the bombers were therefore expended.
[User Picture]
From:7leaguebootdisk
Date:July 27th, 2014 06:45 am (UTC)

Re: a detailed review

(Link)
I'd not heard that. I do know that the sig int people where annoyed that they had not been informed adequately to keep an eye out for such a transmission. I just read "Joe Rochefort's War: The Odyssey of the Codebreaker Who Outwitted Yamamoto at Midway" which covers that period.
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From:mycroftca
Date:July 27th, 2014 06:58 am (UTC)

Re: a detailed review

(Link)
To be honest, I'd not heard this from any of my previous readings, but what he says made good sense. Better to gather more forces close into the Home Islands than to spread them out to possibly be destroyed in detail. The Japanese simply didn't expect anything but carrier aircraft. OTOH, the US forces realized that they'd be pushing it to get in as close as they originally planned, and so they launched much earlier.

Earlier this week, I finished reading Osprey Campaign #156: The… - This ain't no party, this ain't no disco... — LiveJournal

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